The Library of Calebxandria

Less words, more pictures

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Okay, I hate to be that guy, but—wait, no, that’s cool. I actually don’t mind being that guy at all. So yes, while it is true that snakes do not have ears in the same sense that we human beings do, that would have absolutely no bearing whatsoever on whether or not the snake-man Copperhead could be hurt by The Black Canary’s “canary cry” sonic attack. 
Sound is, after all, simply vibration, so in the same way that an opera singer’s voice could shatter a champagne glass, or a jet’s sonic book could shatter the glass of an office building, or Black Canary’s sonic scream could knock dudes down, break glass or shatter brick, it would still hurt Copperhead. 
Glasses, windows and bricks don’t have ears either, but they still suffer from vibrations, right?
Anyway, this not very thoroughly thought out panel is written by Geoff Johns and drawn by Jesus Saiz; it originally appeared in Justice League #18, and is collected in Justice League Vol. 4: The Grid.

Okay, I hate to be that guy, but—wait, no, that’s cool. I actually don’t mind being that guy at all. So yes, while it is true that snakes do not have ears in the same sense that we human beings do, that would have absolutely no bearing whatsoever on whether or not the snake-man Copperhead could be hurt by The Black Canary’s “canary cry” sonic attack. 

Sound is, after all, simply vibration, so in the same way that an opera singer’s voice could shatter a champagne glass, or a jet’s sonic book could shatter the glass of an office building, or Black Canary’s sonic scream could knock dudes down, break glass or shatter brick, it would still hurt Copperhead. 

Glasses, windows and bricks don’t have ears either, but they still suffer from vibrations, right?

Anyway, this not very thoroughly thought out panel is written by Geoff Johns and drawn by Jesus Saiz; it originally appeared in Justice League #18, and is collected in Justice League Vol. 4: The Grid.

Filed under DC comics black canary Geoff Johns

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There are some robot mummies in Mike Maihack’s Cleopatra in Space: Target Practice, and under most circumstances, robot mummies would be my favorite part of any comic book in which they appear. But this one also features teenage Cleopatra (who is, as the title suggests, in space) flying around on a flying sphinx cycle, which also has a side car for her cat, who talks. That’s awesome.

There are some robot mummies in Mike Maihack’s Cleopatra in Space: Target Practice, and under most circumstances, robot mummies would be my favorite part of any comic book in which they appear. But this one also features teenage Cleopatra (who is, as the title suggests, in space) flying around on a flying sphinx cycle, which also has a side car for her cat, who talks. That’s awesome.

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While I thought Ricky Gervais performed quite admirably in Muppets Most Wanted, and was at the center of one of the film’s funnier visual gags near the end, I have to admit I was somewhat disappointed that he was involved primarily as an actor rather than a writer. On the episode of The Ricky Gervais Show in which he discusses art with Stephen Merchant and Karl Pilkington, he joked that the only way to improve upon great stories like A Christmas Carol is to add Muppets, and suggested A Muppets Schindler’s List and a Sophie’s Choice adaptation called Miss Piggy’s Choice, visualized by the animators as shown above.

Filed under Ricky Gervais Muppets

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Here’s a road not taken when it comes to new directions for an Aquaman comic. Yet.

Here’s a road not taken when it comes to new directions for an Aquaman comic. Yet.

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Pretty ladies Simon Gane drew in All Flee!, his comic with writer Gavin Burrows from Top Shelf.

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Wait, what’s the label on the case in the foreground of the first panel say…? MAN THING DROPPI— 

"Man-Thing Dropping"…?

Keep an eye on Previews to see if they ever make a prop replica of that. (Panels from Marvel’s Wolverine and The X-Men #22 by Jason Aaron and Nick Bradshaw).

Wait, what’s the label on the case in the foreground of the first panel say…? MAN THING DROPPI

"Man-Thing Dropping"…?

Keep an eye on Previews to see if they ever make a prop replica of that. (Panels from Marvel’s Wolverine and The X-Men #22 by Jason Aaron and Nick Bradshaw).

Filed under Man-Thing Jason Aaron Nick Bradshaw Marvel Comics

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Does Godzilla set a bad example for impressionable young monsters? Portia and Jason discuss in this scene from Kean Soo’s Jellaby, which has recently been re-released with a new cover via Capstone.

Filed under Jellaby Kean Soo Godzilla

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Can the bad guys in Godzilla, the IDW comic by Duane Swierczynski and Simon Gane, just do that? Assign the name of a (potentially) pre-existing sauropod to a giant, bipedal sea monster? Just for marketing purposes?

And isn’t it kind of weird that Titanosaurus has a name that sounds like a real, prehistoric animal (because his name is appropriated from a real, prehistoric animal), whereas almost all the other Toho kaiju just have made-up fake-ass names? Like Mothra, Rodan, King Ghidorah—those might all sound like cool names for movie monsters, but they don’t sound like scientific names for new species like “Titanosaurus” does, you know?

Filed under Godzilla swierczynski IDW Simon Gane dinosaurs

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This is the best thing ever. 

Just in case you were wondering what the best thing ever is. (It’s this.)

My favorite part of this extremely charming book is that Yeti isn’t necessarily angry or upset in the above image. That’s just his face. Apparently, Yeti just always makes that face.

This is the best thing ever.

Just in case you were wondering what the best thing ever is. (It’s this.)

My favorite part of this extremely charming book is that Yeti isn’t necessarily angry or upset in the above image. That’s just his face. Apparently, Yeti just always makes that face.

Filed under Yeti bigfoot picture books