The Library of Calebxandria

Less words, more pictures

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But Wednesday is New Comic Book Day! it’s the only day of the week I rant and rave!

But Wednesday is New Comic Book Day! it’s the only day of the week I rant and rave!

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For all the picture books and all the comics I’ve read, I don’t recall ever seeing a lion with a mustache before I flipped through a copy of David McKee’s Hide-and-Seek Elmer (William Morrow; 1998). 

For all the picture books and all the comics I’ve read, I don’t recall ever seeing a lion with a mustache before I flipped through a copy of David McKee’s Hide-and-Seek Elmer (William Morrow; 1998). 

Filed under David McKee lion facial hair

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I kind of wish this guy’s uniform/costume was more ice cream-colored, with maybe some white and pink and light blue in it, but I do like that codename. 

I kind of wish this guy’s uniform/costume was more ice cream-colored, with maybe some white and pink and light blue in it, but I do like that codename. 

Filed under G.I. Joe Mark Bellomo

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I don’t know what I find most funny about this guy, 1) that he’s so over-the-top as an anti-environmental villain, 2) that his  title but that it refers to something different than what the acronym generally refers to, meaning he would be constantly having to explain, “No, I’m the Chief Environmental Operative for Cobra, not its Chief Executive Officer,” or 3) that the toy people gave this scary-but-goofy looking supervillain character the name of a Hasbro exec.

I don’t know what I find most funny about this guy, 1) that he’s so over-the-top as an anti-environmental villain, 2) that his  title but that it refers to something different than what the acronym generally refers to, meaning he would be constantly having to explain, “No, I’m the Chief Environmental Operative for Cobra, not its Chief Executive Officer,” or 3) that the toy people gave this scary-but-goofy looking supervillain character the name of a Hasbro exec.

Filed under G.I. Joe Mark Bellomo

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Another entry from writer Mark Bellomo’s Ultimate Guide To G.I. Joe: 1982-1994, which I found to be a very engaging and enjoyable read, despite not caring about the collectible aspect, and just sort of glossing over all he prices and jargon (No idea what “MOC” or “MLC” mean, for example). 
The second paragraph contains the mind-blowing anecdote, that “Hasbro originally wanted them to be little ‘teddy bear’ type creatures akin to the successfully marketed Ewoks” and that writer Larry Hama refused, arguing “We’d better make the Dreadnoks biker thugs.”
First, imagine how awesome and bizarre and completely different the G.I. Joe comics/cartoons/toys would have been if they had made them teddy bears. Second, I love the negotiation implied here; with one party suggesting teddy bears, the other countering with biker thugs.
Finally, one thing I enjoyed about the book, and this might have just been my reading into it, is that Bellomo frequently refers to Hama and Hasbro’s differing opinions on the characters and the line, and there seems to be a tension between the toy people thinking of G.I. Joe in terms of whatever toys they might sell the most of, and Hama trying to keep the line focused on an accurate-ish, realistic-adjacent depiction of the American military of the time period.
The longer you read, the more and more Hama seems to lose the fighting (the toys are insane by 1994), but it’s fun to watch the (again, maybe half-imagined) battle over the line’s integrity.
For example, fairly late in this time period, Hasbro introduced a “Sonic Fighters” line with giant back packs that made battle sounds, and Hama wrote back to them saying he had no idea what a “sonic fighter” even meant, exactly (do they fight with sound? Against sound?), so he just decided to write the character bios “straight,” with no mention of the sonic-ness. 

Another entry from writer Mark Bellomo’s Ultimate Guide To G.I. Joe: 1982-1994, which I found to be a very engaging and enjoyable read, despite not caring about the collectible aspect, and just sort of glossing over all he prices and jargon (No idea what “MOC” or “MLC” mean, for example). 

The second paragraph contains the mind-blowing anecdote, that “Hasbro originally wanted them to be little ‘teddy bear’ type creatures akin to the successfully marketed Ewoks” and that writer Larry Hama refused, arguing “We’d better make the Dreadnoks biker thugs.”

First, imagine how awesome and bizarre and completely different the G.I. Joe comics/cartoons/toys would have been if they had made them teddy bears. Second, I love the negotiation implied here; with one party suggesting teddy bears, the other countering with biker thugs.

Finally, one thing I enjoyed about the book, and this might have just been my reading into it, is that Bellomo frequently refers to Hama and Hasbro’s differing opinions on the characters and the line, and there seems to be a tension between the toy people thinking of G.I. Joe in terms of whatever toys they might sell the most of, and Hama trying to keep the line focused on an accurate-ish, realistic-adjacent depiction of the American military of the time period.

The longer you read, the more and more Hama seems to lose the fighting (the toys are insane by 1994), but it’s fun to watch the (again, maybe half-imagined) battle over the line’s integrity.

For example, fairly late in this time period, Hasbro introduced a “Sonic Fighters” line with giant back packs that made battle sounds, and Hama wrote back to them saying he had no idea what a “sonic fighter” even meant, exactly (do they fight with sound? Against sound?), so he just decided to write the character bios “straight,” with no mention of the sonic-ness. 

Filed under G.I. Joe Larry Hama Dreadnoks Mark Bellomo

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Erich Zann, from H.P. Lovecraft’s short story “The Music of Erich Zann,” tries to warn Sabrina Spellman, from Archie Comics’ Sabrina The Teenage Witch, about Lovecraft’s evil space god-monsters, in a sequence from Afterlife With Archie #6, by Francesco Francavilla and Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa.
I found the second panel particularly interesting, as I used to wonder if Lovecraft had inadvertently invented kaiju like Godzilla in his stories about giant monsters like Cthulhu.
Now I know that Godzilla’s ancestry is more likely directly influenced by previous movie monsters like the Rhedosaurus in 1953’s The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms and the title character in 1933’s King Kong, both of whom were partially inspired by the rampaging Brontosaurus at the end of the 1925 Lost World film (and, in Kong’s case, the ape-man from an earlier scene in the same film).

Erich Zann, from H.P. Lovecraft’s short story “The Music of Erich Zann,” tries to warn Sabrina Spellman, from Archie Comics’ Sabrina The Teenage Witch, about Lovecraft’s evil space god-monsters, in a sequence from Afterlife With Archie #6, by Francesco Francavilla and Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa.

I found the second panel particularly interesting, as I used to wonder if Lovecraft had inadvertently invented kaiju like Godzilla in his stories about giant monsters like Cthulhu.

Now I know that Godzilla’s ancestry is more likely directly influenced by previous movie monsters like the Rhedosaurus in 1953’s The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms and the title character in 1933’s King Kong, both of whom were partially inspired by the rampaging Brontosaurus at the end of the 1925 Lost World film (and, in Kong’s case, the ape-man from an earlier scene in the same film).

Filed under Archie Comics Afterlife With Archie King Kong Rhedosaurus Godzilla Cthulhu Eric Zahn Sabrina The Teenage Witch Francesco Francavilla

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I have not yet seen the new Hercules movie, Hercules, but based on the fact that this Hercules has a beard and is wearing a lion hat, I feel pretty confident in assuming it is better than the previous Hercules movie, The Legend of Hercules, which starred the young, beard-less, lion hat-less Kellan Lutz.
I hope there is a seen of The Rock’s Hercules springing out of bed and dressing hurriedly one morning before he’s had his coffee, pulling his lion hat on too hard and too fast and accidentally poking himself in the eyes with the lion teeth, but somehow I sincerely doubt it.

I have not yet seen the new Hercules movie, Hercules, but based on the fact that this Hercules has a beard and is wearing a lion hat, I feel pretty confident in assuming it is better than the previous Hercules movie, The Legend of Hercules, which starred the young, beard-less, lion hat-less Kellan Lutz.

I hope there is a seen of The Rock’s Hercules springing out of bed and dressing hurriedly one morning before he’s had his coffee, pulling his lion hat on too hard and too fast and accidentally poking himself in the eyes with the lion teeth, but somehow I sincerely doubt it.

Filed under Hercules The Rock nemean lion Lion Hat

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Please note that this book does not have anything to do with Momo, the shaggy-haired, Bigfoot-like creature from Missouri whose name is derived from “Missouri Monster.” 

Please note that this book does not have anything to do with Momo, the shaggy-haired, Bigfoot-like creature from Missouri whose name is derived from “Missouri Monster.”
 

Filed under momo bigfoot

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These are various sketches that appear under the heading of “Beloved Failed Characters” in Hiro Mashima’s Monster Soul. I’m especially intrigued by the minotaur character, variously labeled simply as “Minotaur” and “Underground Minotaur.” 

I find myself curious as to what’s up with his head, which began as a perfect cube before evolving into something more square-like. Also, despite apparently being a cow (note the udder/abs), he expresses an interest in breasts, and another humanoid cow character refers to him as a “boy.”

Gender identity among cows is so confusing…

Filed under monster soul minotaurs hiro mashima